ESC HOME
Blog
MENU
Community HQ Escape Stories International Meetups The Escape Manifesto Latest School HQ Esc Opportunities Home About us Contact us Success stories The Escape Blog

Advice for ‘Starting Something You Love’ – #56 to #62

Morning all.

To avoid crowding our blog with hundreds of Start Something You Love quotes we’re combining the week’s 7 posts into one.

This is the first. Next one coming next Monday. Hope you’re enjoying the nuggets of wisdom – we certainly are!

—————————

At the beginning of 2011 we started a campaign called Start Something You Love. We kicked it off on 19th January with our big Esc winter party in front of 600 people at Guanabara bar in central London.

We are now following it up with 365 bits of advice from real people who are doing interesting and inspirational things with their lives. And we asked them all the same question:

“HOW CAN I START SOMETHING I LOVE?”

#56: Ian Bruce:

Mr Bruce from The Correspondents, artist:

Something isn’t worth doing unless you are nervous and excited in equal measure. At every stage endeavour to do the best you can as you never know who might take notice.

#57: Mike Chapman:

Leaving management consulting  for Cancer Research Intelligence

Don’t listen too much to the senior people at your current firm who tell you what a big mistake you’re making. First, they’re the unrepresentative few who have stuck out a career in the city; second, they need you to meet their revenue target this year. On the other hand don’t burn any bridges.

This is some advice that I was given when I was at university: The traditional career path is pretty much dead; no one is going to retire forty-odd years later from the firm they joined at 20. So take risks and move about – if something goes belly up you can always start again.

#58: Jorge Salavisa:

My Life Is Not My Job

Someone once advised me to take one year to travel abroad doing odd jobs to pay my bills. According to him that experience would make me realize that I am in control of my life and I shouldn’t fear financial insecurity. If I was able to “survive” that year, I would come back a changed person, a person that knows that he can decide his own destiny, and doesn’t let others decide it for him.

#59: Katkin Pringle:

On being a professional artist:

By being confident in yourself, it will reassure people that your ambition is likely to be a successful one. Don’t give up easily, it is a hard world, all artists like actors have many knocks but eventually you will find your niche and be accepted.

Don’t expect it all to happen immediately, it takes time but perseverance will stand you in good stead.

#60: Jon Cousins:

Starting Moodscope – the online mood tool

Many years ago an old boss told me to start up on my own rather than taking someone else’s money to do so. It’s surprising how much you can do without money if you put your mind to it.

I don’t think I’d quite expected there to have been so many mistakes and failures on the way. However, in retrospect we’ve learned masses from this. When you first start encountering failure it’s difficult not to be disheartened. What I wish I’d known is :  You will fail. Pick yourself up and carry on.

#61: Charlie Walker:

Ex-journalist on a 4-year cycle

Hit the road Jack!

#62: Venetia van Hoorn Alkema:

London photographer & stylist

Not really advice but I once asked a photographer I knew whether he thought it a good idea going to photography school and he said: “Don’t do it, the field’s saturated, digital has ruined everything, you’ll never make any money and I think you’re crazy to even consider it.” To which I said, “Ok… well… I think I’m going to do it.” He responded, “Well then you’ve got a chance.” Dogged determination is the message I suppose.

Call EVERYONE. Email EVERYONE. Be a pest. Wear comfortable shoes and don’t drop anything.

Now do three things…